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Tuesday, 3 April 2007

How to make the ultimate drying rack

Living in South Korea, it is rare to have a dryer in your home. Most people dry their clothes on drying racks. This is the most economical way (it's good for the environment as well) to dry your clothes. You will save on the electricity bill and you'll feed good about yourself. Drying racks are dirt cheap and our drying racks were supplied by our employer (and from the previous couple who lived in our officetel; they were gracious enough to donate theirs to us).

So you're probably feeling pretty fuzzy right now. But wait, there are some downsides to drying your clothes on a rack. Sometimes, even with the addition of fabric softener, your previously soft cotton towels will dry up into one crusty, sandpaper-like, piece of cardboard. The days of launching your damp clothes into the dryer and walking away are over. Now you have to hang dry each individual piece of clothing which takes time. Also, the feeling of fresh clothes right out of the dryer are long gone. So if you're in Korea teaching English...get used to it! Most traditional Chinese households dry their clothes on drying racks back home. My family did at least, so I've been accustomed to stretched out t-shirt collars for a while now!

Anyways, if you want to make the ultimate drying rack all you have to do is find the following: find some bushes, miscellaneous foliage, or a flat surface and then launch your clothes on top to dry (watch out for Yellow Dust). Okay, so the following is not exactly clothing but they're towels. They are most likely for Dan Sushi to wipe and clean their cutting boards (I really hope it's not for them) or some ajuma that will use these for wiping down the elevator. Regardless, here is the ultimate drying rack...

It gets really dusty and dirty in the city, so drying them outside is not exactly the best idea...I could be wrong though. Maybe the pollution makes sushi taste better!


For those living in Korea, do you use a drying rack or dryer?

6 comments:

Sandra said...

When I used to live in a studio apartment in L.A. I used a drying rack too. It cost $1.00! to use the dryer.

annamatic said...

When we came to Korea, we bought a combo washer/dryer! I thought it was a fantastic invention, until I discovered that it takes like 3 hours to complete a wash dry cycle... My family didn't buy a dryer until I moved out, so I'm used to the line dried clothes... problem here is that damn rainy season...

Gdog said...

Sandra: Very interesting! Drying racks rock...but sometimes you miss getting clothes shrunk from a dryer.

annamatic: 3 hours? That's hilarious. I would by wary of using a line to dry clothes where I live...too much pollution from the highway next to us. I could dry my clothes outside on the rooftop, but somebody might steal them!

Joshua said...

I have a Tromm washer/dryer combo. It basically bakes the clothes. It gets so much hotter than a normal dryer. Also, there's no fan blowing the air around so the clothes come out very wrinkly. So, I only use it for underwear, socks, and I sometimes half/dry my jeans.

ak said...

also have a Tromm washer/dryer, but hang my clothes on my loft ledge to dry, cuz the way electricity pricing is tiered here, im fearful of the cost to dry it in the little Tromm!

Linda said...

In the three years that I have been here, I have been in 3 seperate apartments. In the first two, I also had a Tromm. The first one was ok, and dried nicely. It did take a long time to get laundry done though. The second Tromm didn't dry well, so I used both the dryer and a rack. In my current apartment my employer (American) supplied me with an American washer and dryer combo. Woohoo!! I'm liking this one. Hopefully I won't have to move again.

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