Welcome! How to Use This Blog...

Step 1: Teaching in Korea FAQ
Step 2: Read The Top Posts of 2006
Step 3: How to Find a Job Teaching in Korea

Sunday, 24 February 2008

Eating Samgyeopsal in Richmond!

I'll admit, I am dedicating a lot less time writing posts for this blog. Honestly, I've been so busy with work and other online endeavors that I have been neglecting this blog. However, I am grateful to all of you guys that still swing by here once in a while to check up on things!

Anyways, earlier last week went went for a Korean meal in Richmond--samgyeopsal and samgyetang to be exact! This has only been the second time we've had Korean since we arrived back in Canada. You can read about our first encounter in Coquitlam here.

Why you ask? Well, I think we both had more than enough of our fair share during our time teaching English in Korea. Plus, it's so darn hard to eat anything else but delicious and cheap Chinese food in Ricemond!

So our restaurant this time around was none other than Kyung Bok Palace (check out my visit to the REAL palace here) located inside Landsdowne Shopping Mall.


On the menu today, some samgyeopsal for me and some samgyetang for Devante. Let's take a look at the pictures, shall we?

This samgyeopsal was sliced very thin, unlike the thick chunks in Korea. I loved the thick slabs...mmm...pork fat...


The ajumma (aka a teenager) flipping my pork belly...they forgot to turn on the fan, which I politely reminded them to do so:


What is this stuff again? OH right...it's called kimchi!


Remember what I said about it being sliced too thin? It's like I had crispy bacon (yes, I know this is too well done, blah blah blah; I like my samgyeopsal crispy and not fatty)!


Overall, the meal definitely was overpriced compared to prices in Korea--by a long shot. This meal would have cost 26,000w in Korea, but it cost us about $45CDN after tax and tip (that's what I miss about eating in Korea--no gratuities!). The side dishes were really good and everything tasted fresh. Too bad their service wasn't up to par. We were 1 out of 3 tables, yet I had to ask for so many things.

Anyways...let's hope our next Korean experience will be a bit better. What should I eat next?

11 comments:

ski insurance said...

looks delicious! available just in korea, im afraid

Colin Boyd said...

Wow!, That food looks amazing, I'd love to try real Kimchi in Korean, it must be amazing

Anonymous said...

An ajumma is not a teenager...

Gdog said...

I meant the usual "ajumma" was a teenager in this instance...I know what an ajumma is. :)

Mali Hotels said...

ya looking yummy!! :) and well decorated

Mohan Kumar said...

You got a nice blog man !! nice and spicy :D , too gud !! Keep up the good work !!


cheers :)
Mohans World

matthew26 said...

looks very scrumptious, i have try it for myself.yum!

yongjinee said...

Mmm. I love Korea food. My favorite food from asia is Jjam bbong... Can you subscribe to my feed at my site. I'll gladly visit yours more often. Thanks.

jauzi90 said...

wow.. looks great..

Morning Star said...

Yummy! My husband and I also love Samgyeopsal. He also taught English in Korea for a year and half, and discovered Samgyeopsal. When we go to Seattle or Las Vegas, we always go to a Korean restaurant to eat Samgyeopsal. Please check out our funny Samgyeopsal video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhdDPpXwms0 FYI, Ajumma means a married woman in Korean, not a teenager.

Anonymous said...

I think she knows what an "Ajumma" is. Since there seems to be more than one person who didn't get it, she was saying that the usual adjumma in this instance was a teenager. Does she have to spell this out for you?

Recent Posts

Learn Korean with KoreanClass101.com